Tuesday, December 30, 2008


yields 12 servings

1/2 cup fresh Italian parsley leaves
1/4 cup olive oil
3 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
3 large garlic cloves, peeled
2 tablespoons adobo sauce from canned chipotles
2 bay leaves
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
2 2-pound skinless boneless turkey breast halves

2 pounds applewood-smoked bacon slices
Hazelnut Mole (recipe below)
Chopped fresh parsley

Combine first 9 ingredients in processor; blend until marinade is almost smooth. Rub marinade all over turkey breast halves. Place turkey in 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish; pour remaining marinade over. Cover and chill overnight.

Remove turkey from marinade, allowing some marinade to cling to turkey. Sprinkle turkey with salt and pepper. Place 1 pound bacon slices side by side on work surface, overlapping slightly. Place 1 turkey breast half, rounded side down, atop bacon. Wrap bacon around turkey breast, stretching slices slightly to cover turkey. Secure with toothpicks to hold bacon in place, then tie with kitchen string to secure bacon. Remove toothpicks. Repeat with second turkey breast half and remaining bacon. Place turkey breasts on large rimmed baking sheet. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and chill.)

Preheat oven to 375°F. Place turkey in oven and roast 25 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F and roast until instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of turkey registers 155°F, about 35 minutes. Remove from oven; let turkey rest 15 minutes (internal temperature will reach 162°F).

Cut turkey breasts crosswise into 1/3-inch-thick slices. Ladle generous amount of Hazelnut Mole on large platter. Arrange turkey slices atop mole; sprinkle with parsley and serve.

Hazelnut Mole

makes about 8 cups

6 tablespoons vegetable oil
6 large garlic cloves, peeled
8 ounces hazelnuts with skin (about 2 cups)
1 1/2 large ripe plantains, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch-thick rounds
1 1/2 pounds Red Delicious apples, peeled, quartered, cored
1 medium-size white onion, thickly sliced
13 dried guajillo chiles (about 2.5 ounces), stemmed, cut open, seeds and veins removed
3 dried ancho chiles (about 1.5 ounces), stemmed, cut open, seeds and veins removed
3/4 cup prunes (about 4 ounces)
7 whole cloves
6 whole allspice
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon aniseed
1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 cinnamon stick, broken in half
2 5- to 6-inch-diameter corn tortillas
9 cups (or more) low-salt chicken broth
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

Heat oil in large deep nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add garlic to skillet; sauté 2 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer garlic to large bowl. Add hazelnuts to skillet; sauté until golden, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer to bowl with garlic. Add plantains and sauté until light golden, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer to same bowl. Add apples; sauté until beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer to same bowl. Sauté onion until golden, about 3 minutes; transfer to same bowl (no oil will remain in skillet). Working in batches, sauté a few chiles at a time in same dry skillet, 10 seconds per side; transfer to same bowl. Sauté prunes 2 minutes; transfer to same bowl. Add all spices to skillet and stir 30 seconds. Transfer to same bowl.

Using tongs, turn tortillas over gas flame or in dry skillet over medium-high heat until black spots appear on both sides, about 1 minute. Crumble tortillas into same bowl. Add 9 cups broth to bowl; press down on all ingredients to submerge. Let soak 20 minutes.

Working in batches, puree contents of bowl in blender, adding more broth by 1/4 cupfuls if needed, until almost smooth. Transfer to heavy large pot and bring to boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to medium-low; simmer mole 1 hour 45 minutes, stirring often and adding more broth by 1/4 cupfuls as needed to prevent scorching. (Mole will be very thick and will measure about 8 cups.) Stir in vinegar. Season mole generously with salt. (Can be made 4 days ahead. Cover and chill.)

courtesy of: Roberto Santibañez, Bon Appétit, December 2005

1 comment:

Kurt said...

Will this meet my daily requirement for bacon?